Windows 10 is the annoying boyfriend nobody wants

Windows 10 is a great operating system. It has great features and it’s an ambitious bet for convergence and platform unification. The problem is that once again Microsoft has had big trouble selling its product.

The message was neither clear nor complete. The user was the girl wanting to be conquered. Windows 10 was the aspiring boyfriend.

But it became a boring boyfriend.

It has been unclear on its privacy policy, but it also has been too persistent on trying to conquer that girl. And girls get pretty tired of annoying boys. Those continuous attempts to make users upgrade from their old Windows 7/8/8.1 systems have been more and more irritating, but this final effort has been too much.

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Most girls will say no to the annoying boyfriend. The problem is, many of them could decide they finally want to give this boy and opportunity. And after July 29th they’ll have to pay.

I wonder how many of them will cry out loud and complaing again. At first it was privacy and annoying messages. Later on they will complain about the boy not being free anymore.

Apple, Microsoft, and the future of convertibles 

Paul Thurrot reflects on the convertible/detachable market:

One might argue, correctly, that the iPad Pro is not exactly a full-featured productivity machine today. But the key word in that sentence is “today.” Apple will evolve the iPad Pro and improve things on the productivity side of things. But I don’t see how Microsoft or any PC maker can turn a Surface or other PC tablet into a great consumption tablet. The apps and ecosystems just aren’t there.

And that’s the bit that Microsoft needs to figure out. Surface can see a certain level of success … as a PC. But if Microsoft wants to expand this product beyond that niche usage, it will need to fix the entire Windows ecosystem, a daunting and perhaps impossible task. But all Apple needs to do is keep chipping away at iPad Pro, which already outsells Surface. Imagine how bad it will get when the functionality catches up.

I’d say that for many people productivity equals -right now- a desktop operating system. Microsoft leads the way right now on the convertible market because they didn’t have to change really that much to their Surface line in terms of software. These devices work well as laptop replacements and you can expect to do your job nearly as  efficiently as you would on a laptop or on a desktop.

On the iPad Pro front the problem is exactly the opposite: it works really well as a consumption device -like the iPad has always done- but it doesn’t do that well on the productivity front, where things like a more powerful multitasking, window management or even a file explorer (that’s right, iOS, you don’t have one proper file explorer) are several elements that the user identifies with a productivity environment.

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The question is, which one will perform the other task better and before its rival. The Surface can work as a consumption device, but tablet Mode in Windows is not that good in apps or user experience.

iOS, on the other part, is advancing on the productivity issues and it is becoming clear that software developers will be far interested in taking advantage of the device capabilities becausethe iPad Pro user is a paying customer, one that will probably pay for a good productivity app in order to expand the versatility of that convertible.

I suspect Apple (and Google) have an easier path to conquer the perfect detachable. Remix OS has shown us that. Kids don’t grow using a PC anymore: they grow using a smartphone or a tablet, so Android and iOS are too familiar to them. If those platforms solve the gap to become productivity platforms as well, Microsoft will have a tough battle ahead.