The Xbox One will focus on games, and that’s a good thing

When Microsoft launched the Xbox One it made it in two different keynotes: one devoted to TV and video content, and the second one devoted to games. This console was meant to conquer our sitting room and be our entertainment hub, but users spoke: they just wanted games, and that’s what ultimately made the PS4 gain a big advantage.

Microsoft didn’t surrender of course, and they announced a DVR capability for the Xbox One that was supposedly coming to the console sometime this year. It won’t finally:

Microsoft is no longer planning to add a TV DVR feature to its Xbox One console. The software giant originally unveiled plans to add TV DVR to the Xbox One back in August, noting that the feature would arrive some time in 2016. “After careful consideration, we’ve decided to put development of DVR for Over-the-Air TV on hold to focus our attention on launching new, higher fan-requested gaming experiences across Xbox One and Windows 10,” revealed a Microsoft spokesperson in a statement to The Verge

Users want games? They’ll have games.

Source: Microsoft isn’t adding a TV DVR feature to the Xbox One anymore | The Verge

TV content is way different than web content

Chris DeVille writes about TV channels:

It stands to reason that TV networks are facing a similar situation — when you think about it, aren’t channels and websites essentially the same thing? Both function as containers, providing steady streams of content for targeted populations. Just as you used to discover a few favorite sites and check up on them throughout the day, you would flip on the TV and surf between your go-to channels until something stimulating draws you in.

No, they aren’t. There’s one big difference: anyone can publish something on the internet (video included). Not everyone can have its own TV channel.

That was the past and is the present, but I’m pretty sure it won’t be the future. TV’s future is the internet, so those two kinds of content will merge effectively into one.

As the author explains, not many of them will survive. “Channels with narrow but dedicated audiences will survive“, he points out, and I guess and the same will happen for websites that want to monetize.

That’s tough for the good old TV :/

Netflix and the ‘Allow Piracy Until Popular’ model

Netflix has had a spectacular growth in the last few years. Partly because the great content, and partly because Netflix policy on how users can enjoy the service has been pretty lax.

You can share your monthly subscription with others (not necessarily your relatives) and until last thursday, you could use proxies to access Netflix from other countries that had no access to the service. That was the case where I live in Spain for many years, but last october Netflix finally was available here.

In the last few weeks we’ve seen how Netflix  has announced a global expansion. That shows clearly how mature the service is, but that ambition coincides with the decision to ban proxies, even if users don’t care about that. I suspect the sharing policy will change too soon enough.

Piracy was good until popular again. It has been so with several software platforms, with music services, with console games, with YouTube -as Alex pointed out– and, of course, with Netflix.

Amazon banning Chromecast, Apple TV: my country, my rules

 

Amazon.com Inc. will stop selling media-streaming devices from Google Inc. and Apple Inc. that aren’t easily compatible with its video service, the latest example of the company using its clout to promote products that fit with its own retailing strategy.

It’s unfair for users that take advantage of Amazon great service, but it’s a logical decision from a business point of view.

The move, coming just before the year-end holiday shopping season, shows how Amazon is willing to sacrifice sales of popular brand name products — Apple and Google have the best-selling media streaming devices generally — to bolster its own video-streaming service

The explanation is weak, yes -Chromecast and Apple TV aren’t “easily compatible with its video service- but at the end what matters is trying to get traction in this segment. Helping competitors to get their content instead of yours is silly.

I’d have done the same exact thing.

Source: Amazon to Ban Sale of Apple, Google Video-Streaming Devices – Bloomberg Business