Netflix and the ‘Allow Piracy Until Popular’ model

Netflix has had a spectacular growth in the last few years. Partly because the great content, and partly because Netflix policy on how users can enjoy the service has been pretty lax.

You can share your monthly subscription with others (not necessarily your relatives) and until last thursday, you could use proxies to access Netflix from other countries that had no access to the service. That was the case where I live in Spain for many years, but last october Netflix finally was available here.

In the last few weeks we’ve seen how Netflix  has announced a global expansion. That shows clearly how mature the service is, but that ambition coincides with the decision to ban proxies, even if users don’t care about that. I suspect the sharing policy will change too soon enough.

Piracy was good until popular again. It has been so with several software platforms, with music services, with console games, with YouTube -as Alex pointed out– and, of course, with Netflix.

YouTube Music: try to compete with that, Spotify

The audio streaming services should be pretty worried about the launch of YouTube Music, a streaming service that goes beyond what Google Play Music offers, but also what Spotify, Rdio, Pandora, or Apple Music -to name a few- offer right now.

And that’s because for a similar price you are not getting just the audio, but also customized music video streams that you can enjoy both online and offline, mixtapes that refresh daily and, of course, no ads.

I wonder how Spotify or any other, can compete with that. The only thing missing: you can’t create your own playlists, a feature that is available on Google Play Music.

I’m expecting two things here: the extinction of Google Play Music (to merge with YouTube Music), and the dusk of this new streaming trend that will probably have only another guest star: Facebook.

Source: YouTube Music is here, and it’s a game changer | The Verge

Follow-up: Gizmodo has a pretty different view.

Amazon banning Chromecast, Apple TV: my country, my rules

 

Amazon.com Inc. will stop selling media-streaming devices from Google Inc. and Apple Inc. that aren’t easily compatible with its video service, the latest example of the company using its clout to promote products that fit with its own retailing strategy.

It’s unfair for users that take advantage of Amazon great service, but it’s a logical decision from a business point of view.

The move, coming just before the year-end holiday shopping season, shows how Amazon is willing to sacrifice sales of popular brand name products — Apple and Google have the best-selling media streaming devices generally — to bolster its own video-streaming service

The explanation is weak, yes -Chromecast and Apple TV aren’t “easily compatible with its video service- but at the end what matters is trying to get traction in this segment. Helping competitors to get their content instead of yours is silly.

I’d have done the same exact thing.

Source: Amazon to Ban Sale of Apple, Google Video-Streaming Devices – Bloomberg Business