Oculus Rift as the PC savior

oculus

Yesterday Oculus revealed the details of the first PCs that will be able to show the “Oculus Ready” tag. These computers will come from makers such as ASUS and Alienware and will allow end users to enjoy a guaranteed VR experience that (theoretically) won’t suffer for glitches and problems.

Do-it-yourselfers who scrounge around part-picking websites may be able to get a slightly better deal on an extremely bare-bones PC that can power the Oculus Rift, but the bundled savings mean these Oculus Ready towers actually provide some decent value for the money. The Oculus Ready line should also provide an easy, “all-in” solution for eager virtual reality early adopters that have more curiosity than hardware-building prowess.

Those PCs won’t be exactly cheap, and even if you upgrade your system or decide to build one of your own, you’ll have to admit one thing:

Oculus Rifts are great news for the PC market.

I suspect there won’t be an enormous growth of those PC offered with the “Oculus Ready” certification, and the reason is that I guess early Rift adopters were already gamers and had systems that complied with the minimum requirements.

The $599 price for the Oculus Rift hardware won’t appeal most users if they have to spend another $1K in parts or a whole system. Not at least virtual reality really delivers what is expected from it -and we expect a lot-. If it does, if it indeed delivers, the Post-PC era could in fact be a great lie again.

 

Dell buys EMC, a new IBM is born

 

Michael Dell

Dell has paid a staggering $67 billion for EMC, an enterprise storage solutions provider (oh, and that VMware thing). That could sound nice in the regular newspaper, but the deal is a little weird both for end users and for enterprise users.

End users don’t really know that Dell has been playing a prominent role in different enterprise scenarios for the last few years: they only know the company as a PC maker.

They were born this way, but they recognized long ago that the PC era wasn’t going to be eternal. The dawn of the smartphone has made Michael Dell change its focus, and now enterprise is what really matters.

It’s the same thing IBM did when they recognized that their business was not going to be in the end-user space: clones were threatening their IBM PCs, so they withdrew that market. The enterprise market was a safe bet.

Dell is doing the same. I wonder how many surprises we’ve got left from this company in the end-user market. Their Dell XPS machines have been a solid and interesting proposal, but they don’t seem to be able (or be interested, for that matter) to keep the pace of that Microsoft that is surprising us with the new Surface Book.

I guess the PC market is now a liability for them. The company is now more boring than ever, but this has been probably a good business choice.

Source: Dell Buys EMC For $67B In Largest Deal In Tech History