The Chromebook question

I’m currently on vacation so I’ll write less often. I’ll keep reading what’s going on thanks to Twitter and my smartphone, and yesterday I found an interesting article titled ‘Why I left my new MacBook for a $250 Chromebook. There are a few good arguments there to defend a platform that previously wasn’t that easy to support.

The first one: we spend more and more time working and entertaining ourselves on the cloud. There’s an inherent problem there in my opinion: being too much dependent on those services and their servers is really nice and convenient, but you could find yourself losing everything you had there -so safe, so secure, right?- if you are not careful enough.

The second one: Chrome OS support for Android apps is coming, so suddenly we’ve got something that gives us a truly convergent platform from Google. It may be not Remix OS, but it’t a really good way to way to solve the problem taking advantage of both the virtues of Chrome OS and Android. Google seemed pretty stubborn when asked if Chrome OS and Android would merge eventually, and this kind of support finally answers this question.

Mobile and desktop computing, together at last.

This makes Google the owner of one of the greatest and more powerful software platforms ever developed. Only the App Store could compete here, because Microsoft has fallen behind in a segment it owned for so long.

chromebook-pixel2

The author from that post gave a few examples of some apps from OS X that had pretty good alternatives in Chrome OS thanks to their web application versions, but this is almost anecdotal when now we’ll have access to a software catalog with more than 2 million apps -there’s certainly a lot of useless ones- to solve our needs and never look back again to a pure desktop OS.

That could take some time, of course, but for me that conquest of the desktop from mobile OS is the future. Why not buying a Chromebook yet? The time hasn’t come for me yet, but I’ve recently crowdfunded the Superbook at Kickstarter, a device I find even more interesting on the short term.

Better and faster Chromebooks will come in the Fall with the announcement of the final version of Android N. These machines will of course support Android apps as one of their selling points, and maybe there we’ll start to see where this kind of merger develops. Chrome OS and Android will make sense on desktop machines too, so we¡ll be living interesting times on this front as well.

Ballmer vs Nadella

Ballmer has never been the shy CEO, but I thought that at times it was just a role he had to play in order to represent Microsoft. His public/business image never worked for me. I can only think of him shouting, and his business decissions were debatable to say the least.

It seems Ballmer was just Ballmer, and the recent critics against Nadella and its strategy are harsh, inelegant and not necessarily smart.

When he says the new universal apps approach “won’t work” and he points out that users must be able to run Android apps on their Windows mobile devices he is making the same mistake BlackBerry did.

Getting other platform apps on yours is not the solution, and it’s not the solution because if I want to take advantage of a platform software and services, I will buy a device that runs these software and services natively.

Your ideas won’t work, Steve. Your ideas won’t work.

Source: Ballmer Chides Microsoft Over Cloud Revenue Disclosures – Bloomberg Business