Netflix and the ‘Allow Piracy Until Popular’ model

Netflix has had a spectacular growth in the last few years. Partly because the great content, and partly because Netflix policy on how users can enjoy the service has been pretty lax.

You can share your monthly subscription with others (not necessarily your relatives) and until last thursday, you could use proxies to access Netflix from other countries that had no access to the service. That was the case where I live in Spain for many years, but last october Netflix finally was available here.

In the last few weeks we’ve seen how Netflix  has announced a global expansion. That shows clearly how mature the service is, but that ambition coincides with the decision to ban proxies, even if users don’t care about that. I suspect the sharing policy will change too soon enough.

Piracy was good until popular again. It has been so with several software platforms, with music services, with console games, with YouTube -as Alex pointed out– and, of course, with Netflix.

Author: Javier Pastor

Javier Pastor is a technology journalist that has been writing about tech since 1999. He started writing for PC Actual in Spain, the leading printed magazine in the country, and in 2006 started to write online. First as the Chief Editor for The Inquirer ES, and after that for MuyComputer until 2013. That year he became senior editor at Xataka, the leading tech news website in Spanish with over 5M uniques/month (Aug'15, comScore). Xataka is part of Weblogs SL, a blog network that gets over 40M uniques/month and that has a wide catalog of publications in Spanish. The Unshut is his new venture and allows him to express his opinions and thoughts on everything touched by technology, and follows what he has been doing at Incognitosis, his personal blog, since 2005.