The absurd backdoor

China passed a controversial new anti-terrorism law on Sunday that requires technology firms to help decrypt information, but not install security “backdoors” as initially planned, and allows the military to venture overseas on counter-terror operations.

Counter-terrorism efforts are beginning to be infuriating. Most countries are passing laws against encryption and privacy that for lots of people are even more concerning that the terrorist attacks themselves.

China is the latest one to propose the integration of backdoors for government purposes on all kinds of electronic equipment, and that’s only another sign of defeat. Not for terrorists, of course: I assume their goal has never been the suppression of our privacy. Glenn Greenwald is on the spot on this issue:

This is a defeat for our society, and I really hope small and big technology companies do not play that game. Apple seems to lead that stance, something that could affect their current business in the asiatic giant, but that really honors them.

Source: China passes controversial counter-terrorism law

Author: Javier Pastor

Javier Pastor is a technology journalist that has been writing about tech since 1999. He started writing for PC Actual in Spain, the leading printed magazine in the country, and in 2006 started to write online. First as the Chief Editor for The Inquirer ES, and after that for MuyComputer until 2013. That year he became senior editor at Xataka, the leading tech news website in Spanish with over 5M uniques/month (Aug'15, comScore). Xataka is part of Weblogs SL, a blog network that gets over 40M uniques/month and that has a wide catalog of publications in Spanish. The Unshut is his new venture and allows him to express his opinions and thoughts on everything touched by technology, and follows what he has been doing at Incognitosis, his personal blog, since 2005.